Monthly Archives: May 2013

LA’s mmj initiatives on radio show – divergent views aplenty

This is not a hard equation….Which one provides more access? That is our goal, right? On Sun, May 12, 2013 at 8:24 PM, LANNYSWERDLOW <l..w@earthlink.net>wrote: > On May 21, voters in Los Angeles will be voting on three medical marijuana > collective initiatives to allow collectives to operate legally. It is has > been a tortuous path to this election and you can learn all about it on the > 6 p.m. Monday, May 13 broadcast and simulcast of Marijuana Compassion and > Common Sense. > > Our featured guests are ASA Executive Board Member Don Duncan and Degé > Coutee, Executive Director of Patient Advocacy Network. All is not rosy > regarding these initiatives and our guests will present their divergent > views on these three ballot measures. > > Like Prop. 19, the ballot measures have produced not unity but discord and > vitriol within our community. Like Prop. 19, when you get down to the > bottom of the disagreement, it’s all about money. The election in L.A. is > another of these MMJ momentous events so tune in this Monday, May 13 at 6 > p.m. and hear it from two who are down in the trenches. > > The award winning radio show Marijuana Compassion and Common Sense is > broadcast every Monday at 6 p.m. on IE Talk Radio KCAA 1050AM and simulcast > at www.kcaaradio.com. Past shows can be accessed at www.kcaaradio.com by > scrolling down on the homepage to Marijuana Compassion and Common Sense and > clicking on PODCAST. > > > > — >

End the War on Drugs: Ron Paul, Chris Christie, Andrew M. Cuomo, Jay & Silent Bob

We need to repeal the whole war on drugs. It isn’t working. We don’t have to have more courts and more prisons. This has to change. Prohibition didn’t work. Prohibition on drugs doesn’t work. We have spent over 400 billion dollars. It’s a waste of money We need to come to our senses. We don’t treat alcoholics like this. Too many people doin’ time. Somebody tell me – when did recreation become a crime? It’s bright-eyed kids we’re sendin into prison. They go in as superheroes and come out supervillains The war on drugs is a failure Of 50,000 arrests, 82% were black and hispanic. These arrests stigmatize, they criminalize. Making it harder to find a job. Making it harder to get into school. Making it harder to turn their lives around. It must end and it must end now. The war on drugs, while well-intentioned, has been a failure. We’re warehousing addicted people every day in state prisons. Giving them no treatment, sending them back on the street. And wondering why they don’t get better. Why they commit crimes again? Well, they commit crimes to support their addiction. The war on drugs is a failure The cops got better things to do anyway. Like stop real crimes instead of wasting time chasing that mary jane. Stoned people don’t start fights. Stoned people don’t rob banks. The worst thing stoned people do is steal their roommate’s oreos. And that’s a misdemeanor. Enjoy: http://youtu.be/ykvc20YpXAQ NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/19/opinion/gregory-brothers-the-war-on-drugs-is-a-failure.html Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York, former Representative Ron Paul of Texas, Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, Kevin Smith & Jason Mewes From: The Gregory Brothers — —

Thanks to Lanny and J David

I agree that this was a fight worth fighting. In the final analysis we are confined by the wording and not the implied intent of Prop 215. Prop 215 was not an initiative to make cannabis available for medicinal use ,even though many might like to think so.It was an initiative that addressed only the criminal law. It makes possession of cannabis for medical purposes with a doctors recommendation no longer a crime. It also allows medicinal cannabis patients to cultivate cannabis. As we have seen ,the initiative did not affect zoning or land use planning. Now that said,as we recognize the limitations of Prop 215,after this Supreme Court decision and the Ross v. Raging Wire it is time for the legislature to step up to the plate and make the intent of 215 more functional. We should push for having cannabis regulated like any other medicinal product. If it is equivalent to a prescription medicine than the same regulations that apply to drug stores should be applied to dispensaries. If it is an herbal remedy than the land use planning codes that apply to vitamin and herbal product stores should be applied to dispensaries. THANK YOU LANNY AND DAVID. Peace David Bearman,M.D. — Liz McDuffie <l..z@mccdirectory.org> wrote: > Well said. > On May 10, 2013, at 11:17 PM, John L wrote: > > > Let us be sure to recognize the significant effort Lanny Swerdlow and J David Nick have made on the behalf of all California Cannabis and Hemp supporters. Although the May 6th decision was not what we had hoped for, it does not dilute their effort in any way. > > > > Lanny and his partners put their very livelihood, if not their personal freedom on the line. And although they may have chosen to shut down their access location, we know they will continue to use their skills and resources to carry on the fight in other ways. > > > > David stood up for us all when he took the challenge to argue Lanny’s case in front of the California Supreme Court. Among many points, there is one significant thing we can take away that stands out in spite of the decision. David’s statements and arguments along with the questions posed themselves will certainly help us clarify much of the specific verbiage necessary for preparing many future legislative efforts. > > > > We should try to look for the positives found in any situation and how we can use them to improve and prepare each time moving forward. Additionally, there is always value in remembering to acknowledge those who put so much on the line to help advance the cause. > > > > Sincere thanks again to Lanny and David. Their efforts are an inspiration for us all. > > > > John > > > > — > > — > >

What to do about the Federal Landlord Letters?

Hi All, Although the messaging of the DEA is “we are only going after dispensaries within 1,000 feet of schools” the language of the letters could apply to any Cannabis Operation in any State within the U.S. The only difference would be someone not within a “prohibited distance” would get only 20 years in prison, instead of 40 years in prison. As seen from the case of EL CAMINO WELLNESS CENTER v. ERIC HOLDER, Attorney General (2/28/2012 Case: 2:11-cv-02939-GEB-EFB), regardless of how you operate, it is very hard for a collective to beat a federal letter. The good news is, your landlord has a much better chance against these letters. Not only did California voters legalize the sale of marijuana, but state law also bars local or state officials from taking private property by civil forfeiture unless the property owner has been convicted of a crime, and that has not happened in this case. Simply put, by using “equitable sharing,” the federal government and local law enforcement are looking to cash in on a huge bounty by evading state law. No one in America should have their property taken from them by law enforcement officials without first being convicted of a crime. Forfeiture was not supposed to be used as a punishment for a property owner who committed no crime, yet that is exactly how it is being used today-as an arbitrary punishment imposed only against those citizens who have something the government can take to pad their own budgets. In 2012, California law enforcement scored more than $82 million through the program, with the federal program paying out more than $450 million nationwide. How widespread is the problem of civil forfeiture abuse nationwide? In 1986, the year after the U.S. Department of Justice’s Asset Forfeiture Fund was created-the fund that holds the forfeiture proceeds from properties forfeited under federal law and available to be paid out to law enforcement agencies-took in just $93.7 million. Today it holds more than $1.6 billion. You can find a timeline of the recent actions and resources to help your landlord on the Help.SaveCannabis wiki here: http://bit.ly/FedLetters2013 This structure is intended both as a resource and for the contribution of ideas. Please add any relevant information you can. I know it’s short notice, but if you would like to talk in person, come by the A2C2 BBQ today http://bit.ly/511bbq I will be available from 3-5pm to talk about these issues. Best Regards, Dave Hodges Founder A2C2 – the All American Cannabis Club SJCBC – the San Jose Cannabis Buyers Collective SaveCannabis.org — —

Thanks to Lanny and J David

Well said. On May 10, 2013, at 11:17 PM, John L wrote: > Let us be sure to recognize the significant effort Lanny Swerdlow and J David Nick have made on the behalf of all California Cannabis and Hemp supporters. Although the May 6th decision was not what we had hoped for, it does not dilute their effort in any way. > > Lanny and his partners put their very livelihood, if not their personal freedom on the line. And although they may have chosen to shut down their access location, we know they will continue to use their skills and resources to carry on the fight in other ways. > > David stood up for us all when he took the challenge to argue Lanny’s case in front of the California Supreme Court. Among many points, there is one significant thing we can take away that stands out in spite of the decision. David’s statements and arguments along with the questions posed themselves will certainly help us clarify much of the specific verbiage necessary for preparing many future legislative efforts. > > We should try to look for the positives found in any situation and how we can use them to improve and prepare each time moving forward. Additionally, there is always value in remembering to acknowledge those who put so much on the line to help advance the cause. > > Sincere thanks again to Lanny and David. Their efforts are an inspiration for us all. > > John > > — > — >